simeon:

The Case of the Coffee Smart Cover
I bought a new iPad a few weeks ago. With it, I also purchased the tan leather Smart Cover.
I’m not too careful with my cover. I chose the leather cover thinking the more scuffed and damaged it got, the better. I wanted it to look worn. Unfortunately after only two weeks of use it did start to look worn — on one side only.
This asymmetry wouldn’t do. I had a wonderful, horrible idea: I’d stain the cover with coffee.

simeon:

The Case of the Coffee Smart Cover

I bought a new iPad a few weeks ago. With it, I also purchased the tan leather Smart Cover.

I’m not too careful with my cover. I chose the leather cover thinking the more scuffed and damaged it got, the better. I wanted it to look worn. Unfortunately after only two weeks of use it did start to look worn — on one side only.

This asymmetry wouldn’t do. I had a wonderful, horrible idea: I’d stain the cover with coffee.

asymco:

The new iPad now exceeds the total display resolution, has similar speed and storage capacity while having twice the battery life of the thinnest laptop of four years ago. It also has very high quality cameras and GPS and cellular network connectivity which have yet to appear on mainstream PCs. It’s still a lot smaller and half the price and has a larger selection of available software titles at prices a fraction of its elder cousin.

The only value that a desktop of 2008 has over a new iPad is the size of the screen and a larger hard drive.

The point is not so much that the usurper is a “better” computer but that it has come from non-existence to being a contender in two years. It is also narrowing the gap to its comparable ancestors by one year, every year. Arguably that gap now stands at four years.

TNW Apple:

There are probably a lot of reasons why they’re not as good, and most of them seem to have their fair share of issues. But I can give you one reason that I’ve found to be evident across all of the tablets that I’ve tested personally and that seems to be present in the ones that I haven’t yet, going by the reviews: The fluidity and immediacy of touch response in the user interface.

The iPad, along with the iPhone and all of the other iOS devices with a capacitive touch screen, have an incredible responsiveness to touch inputs. The various elements of the user interface, or elements within individual apps all react to the touch as if they were ‘stuck’ to the end of your finger.

When you move, they move. When this behavior is absent, it’s stunningly obvious because, as humans, we all have a natural understanding of the way that things should react when we touch them.

It’s an integral part of the iOS experience and one so deeply ingrained that you may even be forgiven if you call it ‘magical’.

iPad: Year One

"There’s never been anything like iPad. It changes the way students learn and teachers teach. It transforms how businesses do business. It helps doctors take better care of patients. And it’s a whole new way to see the world."